Photogenic Icelandic cliché week

April 23rd, 2010 by Rebekka in Uncategorized

What better way to follow up the volcano photos, than with some Northern Lights?

Next up, I’m going to will the long dormant Geysir to start spurting again,  and maybe go photograph some whales and puffins after that..

jokes aside, it’s taken 5 years since I got into photography before I finally get a chance to photograph the Aurora Borealis.  Seen them at least twice a year, but always when I’m impossibly far away from a camera. I also learned something about them: they’re hard to photograph.  Hopefully I’ll get a chance to do them more justice at some later date.

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Volcanomania

April 21st, 2010 by Rebekka in Uncategorized

When the first volcanic eruption started in March, I adamantly refused to be one of the herd flocking to the site to take pictures of it. Literally thousands of people did so, and the thought of the crowds and the traffic to and fro was seriously offputting, so I figured “someone with a plane and better lenses is going to get better pictures of the lava flow anyway” and left it at that.  (i’ll leave it unsaid if all parts of me agreed with this reasoning)

Then ANOTHER eruption.. Come ON..  This one getting itself all in the news and annoying the hell out of Europe as a whole, keeping everyone from catching their flights, and whatnot.  This time people were being politely asked to stay away from the area, unless they had a good reason.  Since there was no longer a steady stream of people going, I figured now was the time to finally drive out there and at least get a look at it, even if I wouldn’t be able to get any spectacular photos out of it.  Set out yesterday morning (4 am on april 20th) and actually had the road to myself. Awesome.  Got a few worthwhile photos too- nothing mindbogglingly awesome like the long-exposure lightning shots some guy took at night, but I’m pretty sure I’m not able to get to where-ever it was he took those from, so I won’t beat myself up about it.

Edit:  My sister has written a more detailed and accurate account of the eruption, by all means check that out.

I’ll let my photos do most of the talking:

Taken along the Fljótshlíð road. The summer cabins give a sense of scale.

farmhouses nearly obscured by the ominous fog of fine ash

farmhouses nearly obscured by the ominous fog of fine ash

Geese paddling around in an ash-coated pond by the road..The air was uncomfortable to breath at this point, and i was still far from the worst of it.

Geese paddling around in an ash-coated pond by the road..The air was uncomfortable to breath at this point, and i was still far from the worst of it.

Shortly before turning around on the main road, and heading back to take the Fljótshlíð road instead..

Shortly before turning around on the main road, and heading back to take the Fljótshlíð road instead..

These horses are lucky for now.  Farmers caught in the worst of the cloud have been forced to slaughter their animals due to their land being devastated by the ash.

These horses are lucky for now. Farmers caught in the worst of the cloud have been forced to slaughter their animals (at least cows, not sure about horses) due to their land being devastated by the ash.

sheep resting in the morning sun, oblivious to the troublemaker behind them..

sheep resting in the morning sun, oblivious to the troublemaker behind them..

Took this when i was still pretty far away.  From this distance the eruption looks like a very innocent cloud clinging to the mountaintop.

Took this when i was still pretty far away. From this distance the eruption looks like a very innocent cloud clinging to the mountaintop.

Closer up it's a little less innocent looking..

Closer up it's slightly less innocent looking

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